Build Trust Through Storytelling

 

In our work to source, produce and distribute meaningful stories of real people, we believe that trust is paramount. It’s the currency of nonfiction storytelling.

What does that mean in practice? We build trust with clients to create the conditions for making exceptional work; we earn the trust of our subjects to midwife their most vital stories; and we deliver that trust to audiences, all packaged up inside mini-docs, TV series, feature films, photo essays, podcasts, and other storytelling vehicles. We measure success by how well audiences reciprocate that trust back to us – and to the brand partners who make the work possible.

TRUST WITH CLIENTS

Live Action Projects unlocks real stories to build narratives for brands, organizations and partner agencies. Through discrete story workshops, we employ the same tactics we use in originating feature documentaries and TV series to reveal insights for our clients — and to co-construct the narrative foundations they will build upon. Often, we build upon those narratives with them by applying our real storytelling chops and resources to create fully integrated content campaigns.

TRUST WITH SUBJECTS

Live Action Projects unlocks real stories to build narratives for brands, organizations and partner agencies. Through discrete story workshops, we employ the same tactics we use in originating feature documentaries and TV series to reveal insights for our clients — and to co-construct the narrative foundations they will build upon. Often, we build upon those narratives with them by applying our real storytelling chops and resources to create fully integrated content campaigns.

TRUST WITH AUDIENCES

Because we combine award-winning filmmaking with expansive industry relationships, the partners we work with often earn more media by investing in quality content than they could buy with the same budget. A willingness to pull away from advertorial-style branding and to commit to quality production can yield extraordinary partnerships with mainstream distribution outlets.

For example, Wounded Warrior Project (WWP) funded a 12-part documentary series, pitched and co-directed by Live Action founder David Modigliani, which was acquired by MSNBC and Netflix. MSNBC  aired one episode per month for a year, providing bundles of precious airtime, monthly tent-poles for the WWP’s messaging and millions of impressions on new audiences.

As owner of the series copyright, WWP now receives quarterly royalties from Netflix – a literal return on their investment. Had WWP taken the same budget and created a series of short PSAs and then bought media to distribute them, it would not have achieved nearly the same reach – and, just as importantly, audiences would not have encountered WWP’s brand and mission in such a unique and inviting way.